Postcards from the Past – August 22, 1962

August 22, 1962
August 22, 1962

August 22, 1962

Addressed to Miss Lilian Schley Monocacy Hall Nursing Home Frederick, MD.  Card reads : Will tell you about the sights when we get home.  Arrived at St. Thomas today.  5 days on the Ocean.  Love Mary & Wilson.

View fomr Government Hill to the Harbor, St. Thomas, V.I.

 

Postcards from the Past – August 14, 1963

August 14, 1963
August 14, 1963

August 14, 1963

This postcard is addressed to Mr. & Mrs. N.W. Schley 2427 Stuart Avenue Richmond, VA.  It reads – Here we are!  Gosh – what a beautiful place & the food is grand.  Sorry it’s only for 3 days.  We fished today but did not catch too much.  It is grand and warm and the boys are having a ball.  Bob and I are too.  Will write when I get home.  Love, Betty.

Hasting-Miramar on the boardwalk, Ocean City, MD - Back

Postcards from the Past – March 30, 1942

Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet
Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet

Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet

The postcard is addressed to Mrs. Wilson Schley from E. Clarence Shepherd, an agent for Cigar-Whelan Stores Corp. on 52 N. Market Street, Frederick, MD.  The only words on the card are “Kindly Call.”

Postcard-2-back

Inez Vistula Bowlen Gardiner

InezGardinerdeathcertificate.jpg

Certificate of Death for my Great-Grandmother.

InezGardinerdeathcertificate

Madness Monday – Delzell Family from Maryland

1850 Census Rockville, MD

How does an entire family disappear?  There is literally no trace of this family after the 1850 census taken in Rockville, Maryland. 

Sarah Ann Robinson Worthing Clarke  married Robert Delzell on February 15, 1848 in Frederick, MD.  Delzell has several spelling variants and I have tried them all!

In August of 1850 the family in residing in Rockville, Maryland:

Robert Delzell (b. ca 1825) – head of house

Sarah Delzell (b. ca 1830) wife

James Delzell (b. ca 1848) son

Elizabeth Clarke (b. ca. 1794) mother-in-law

1850 Census Rockville, MD

 From a family bible I know that they had several other children

James W. N. Delzell (twin) b. 17 Dec 1848

Frances W. R. Delzell  (twin) b. December 17 Dec 1848 – she does not appear on the census perhaps she was decesed by 1850

Mary Ellen Delzell b. 23 Nov 1849 – d. 12 Dec1849

Charles Ridgely Delzell b. 13 Feb 1851 – d. 18 Jul 1851

Amanda Milvina Fitzellen Delzell b. 16 May 1852

Robert Basil Delzell b. 12 Jan 1854

Did all of the children pass away?  Looks like they suffered several deaths of infants. Since the mother Sarah got married again I assume that her husband also passed away sometime bet. 1850 and 1855.

On 18 Oct 1855,  Sarah Ann Robinson Worthington Clarke Delzell would marry John F. Carder in Allegany, Maryland.

After that I cannot find them anywhere.  Can anyone offer any clues?

Who do you think you are? My research revealed a Vaudeville Star!

Capture
Charles Cartmell & Laura Harris

I love nothing better than rising early on Sunday’s and delving into my genealogical research with a hot cup of coffee in hand.  I often find myself jumping from one familiar line to another.  I wrote out my research objectives for the day and began searching for information on my GREENE lineage.

I had no idea the delightful surprise I would unveil! The Greene/Green lineage is typically stuffy people with lofty accomplishment.  One of the most noted  is  Thomas Greene  (the second proprietary Governor of Maryland. But today the discovery of an entire family of performers has shed some liveliness on the family line.

The research focus of the day was my 2nd great grand Aunt – EMMA GREEN (1858-1910?). EMMA was the daughter of ELIZABETH CLARK (1825-?) and GILES THOME GREEN (1803-1863).  Elizabeth being much younger than her husband found herself a young widower and left to the rearing of EMMA and her brother ANDREW.

EMMA lived and worked in her mother’s hotel in Uniontown, MD  and on February 19, 1880, EMMA married THOMAS HARRIS (1855-1934)  in Carroll County, MD.

EMMA and THOMAS are listed twice in the 1880 census. One listing their residence and place of work at their mother’s hotel in Uniontown. The second entry was in Baltimore, MD but when I looked at the occupation it listed them both as ACTORS!  A husband and wife team well…well…well.  Finally a little bit of fun in the Green family!  woohoo.  This discovery inspired me to dig a little deeper, after all these are the first actors in the family.

By the 1900′s EMMA and THOMAS were still residing in the Baltimore area and their family had been blessed by the addition of four children.  The 1900 census also revealed that two of the children THOMAS, JR. and LAURA are also actors!  So now I am really excited a family of actors!  What a fun Sunday this was turning out to be!  Errands and household chores could wait.  Due to the excitement I abandoned my typical research protocol and turned to the universe for answers…translated that means to google. So my chubby little fingers deftly typed  LAURA HARRIS + THOMAS HARRIS +ACTOR and Bingo.  The very first result returned was a bio from Will Rogers book – “The Papers of Will Rogers from Vaudeville to Broadway.” Here is the excerpt:

 

So now we can add ANOTHER actor to the family, CHARLES CARTMELL, husband of LAURA HARRIS. If you have lost count we are up to five actors in the same family.

The trio appeared on Broadway together in 1903  All three where on stage for the opening night of the musical comedy “Mrs. Delaney of Newport.”

In 1908 CHARLES & LAURA found themselves on Broadway again in GEORGE M. COHAN’s “Fifty Miles to Boston.” One of Cohan’s featured song’s written in the musical was “Harrigan” Click  here to listen to a great recording of the song I found on YouTube.

Words and Lyrics by GEORGE M. COHAN:

H-A- Double R-I
G-A-N spells Harrigan!
Proud of all the Irish that’s in me.
Divil a man can say a word agin me!
Oh, H-A-Double R-I
G-A-N you see!
It’s the name,
That no shame has ever been connected with
It’s a name that a shame never has been connected with
Harrigan, that’s me!

By 1910 the three actors  – THOMAS, CHARLES and LAURA were  residing in Manhattan, NY .  The census confirmed again that all three were still performing.

In 1912 CHARLES would go on New York’s Broadway theatre solo in the musical comedy, “The Sun Dodgers.” He is listed as performing a dance specialty.

The newspaper archives are filled with rich stories and complimentary reviews of “CARTMELL & HARRIS Vaudeville performances. They travelled all of America and Europe delighting audiences with their talents. One of their most famous numbers that all three performed in was a dancing, comedy skit titled “Golfing with Cupid.”

Below is a picture and excert from the review of their skit:

Cartmell & Harris in "Golfing with Cupid"

Click on the link below for the full article.

<a href=”http://www.newspaperarchive.com/FreePdfViewer.aspx?img=71080054&firstvisit=true&terms=Review” >Review of “Golfing with Cupid”</a>

In 1918 they performed opening night in Raymond Hitchcock’s Hitchy-Koo a musical revue with two acts and 14 scenes on Broadway.

The 1930′s found the three actors residing in an actor’s colony in Freeport, Long Island, NY.  Vaudeville actors established the community around 1910 and lived there while not on the road performing.

Another point  of interest is THOMAS HARRIS is now listed in the census as “THOMAS MCSWIGGAN”  Perhaps his birth name was McSwiggan, and his alias of Harris was a stage name. Personally I like it, sounds like a bartender on Grey’s Anatomy.

I love finding obituaries, and I was hoping that the obit of THOMAS HARRIS would answer all of my questions.  However it only created more!  Now I find out that his wife, EMMA GREEN was also an actress and prior her death they also performed together. So if you are still counting we are now up to six actors in the same family.

In addition to that fact the obit lists her name as EMMA MURRAY – who the heck is that?  Her maiden name was GREEN.  Ok – I will just chalk this up to another stage name.  This story is now is now frustrating me. Two steps forward and one step back.

From the best that I can tell with my preliminary research THOMAS MCGUIGAN was born on February 3, 1855 in Philadelphia, PA the son of a saloon-keeper.  At the age of seven he joined a minstrel troupe as a young boy he tap-danced for Abraham Lincoln. In 1875 he made his first appearance at Fox’s Theatre in Philadelphia. In 1876 he formed a team with JACK  MCNEIL.

In 1879 both Harris & McNeil joined “The Three Arnold Brothers”,  while performing with the minstrel troupe the two would dissolve their partnership.  At that point THOMAS began performing with his wife EMMA.  The playbills listed them as “The Harrises.” They performed together until 1889 when Thomas took a stock engagement at the Odeon Theatre in Baltimore.  He remained there 10 years performing one season with his son Tommy and daughter Laura calling themselves “The Three Harrrises.”  He then worked for four years with his daughter and son-in law under the bill of “Harris and Cartmell.” He had an illustrious career and continued performing almost to the end of his days.  He was also lovingly called the “Colonel” and the Mark Twain of Vaudeville.   Thomas Harris aka McSwiggan aka McGuigan passed away in Freeport, Long Island New York in 1934.

Below is the obituary for Thomas Harris:

Charles Cartmell, husband to Laura Harris passed away a few year later.

Below is the obituary of Charles Cartmell:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While I don’t have all of the pieces of the puzzle in place.  I have discovered something about my family that I never knew.  It certainly brightened my day and I hope it brightened yours as well.  You just never know what you discover.

 

Tombstone Cold Case – Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.
Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.

On my walks thru the Central Church Cemetery in New Market, MD. I noticed a plain, small and very old stone that caught my attention. It seemed so diminutive and simple that I wanted to find out a bit about the person buried beneath the stone.  As you can decipher from the photograph the information on the stone is limited –   Basil Dorsey, Jr. (1768-1823).  Nothing else is inscribed other than the name and date.  I decided to add this to my list of Cold Case Tombstones stories. This is a hobby of mine; just choosing a random tombstone and researching.

Basil Dorsey, Jr. was the son of Basil Dorsey (1720-1799) and Harriet Harris (1775-1829).  Jr. was born on Valentine’s Day in Anne Arundel County. In reading local history books it is written that his father, Judge Basil Dorsey,  was appointed the Justice for Frederick County, MD in 1777.

Basil Jr. and Harriet had two daughters Maria (1793-1812)  and Cordelia (1798-married Vachel Randall. and Cordelia.  Cordelia first married William Downey, and secondly Rev. Nicholas Dorsey of Elkridge, a Methodist preacher.

The article,  McKinsey Folger, “New Market’s Name believed Derived from Nearby Plains”  Frederick News Post 24-Sept-1941: pg 10. shares additional information about Cordelia Dorsey Downing. Pat Bishop’s article titled, “Central UM Church plans Hymn Sing Sunday” Frederick News Post 6-Nov-1971: pg 4-B4. Explains that Cordelia Downey donated the land for the church that sits across from her grave.  Isn’t it ironic that father of the person who donated the land has such a diminutive grave. 

Newmarktnewspaper

Tombstone Tuesday – Simpson Family

Simpson Marker

While walking around Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Frederick, Maryland, I ran into the graves of some distant relatives. Below is the tombstone for Paul D. Simpson and his wife Ada W. I also found several other realtive buried in the general proximity. Reviewed the family tree and it appears that Paul Dittmar Simpson (1896-1982) was the son of Ridgely D. Simpson and Annie F. Albaugh. Ridgely was the son of Basil J.F. Simpson and Laura Nusbaum. The handsome Simpson marker is what first caught my attention.

Simpson Marker

Paul & Ada Simpson

Uncle Will goes West

William T. Gardiner
Lydia Ensey Gardiner

Lydia Ensey Gardiner

William T. Gardiner

William T. Gardiner

William (Will) Thomas Gardiner (1858-1938) born in Baltimore, Maryland was the son of William H. Gardiner (1827-1902) and Ann Frances Green Gardiner (1827-1902). In 1860 Will was 2 years of age and residing with his family in the New Market District, Frederick County, MD.  His father’s profession  listed as a farmer. The value of  real estate owned is $500 and personal value is $100.   The census also reveals that his paternal Grandmother, Henrietta was also living with the family[1].

In 1870 the family lived in the New Market District of Frederick County, Maryland but the postal office is listed as Urbana, instead of Frederick.  The family was still engaged in farming.[2] His grandmother no lingered appeared on the census as she [Henrietta Simpson Gardiner] died September 30, 1866 and is buried in the Central Church Cemetery, New Market, Maryland.[3]

In June of 1880 the family is found to be residing on the Cracklin District of Montgomery County, MD.  Will is 21 years of age, and working on the family farm. In addition to his direct family members they also have residing with them Thomas Smallwood, age 13 who serves as a houseboy and Stephen Musgrove, age 15 a farm hand.

On May 2, 1882 Will married Miss Lydia E. Ensey (1854-1886)[4]. The marriage application states that Will resided in Howard County, MD working on a farm.  One would speculate that perhaps he was working on the Ensey’s farm and that is where he met Lydia..of course this is just speculation.  Lydia was born in Poplar Springs, Howard County, MD.  Daughter of Richard L. (1823-1910) and Mary Jane Ensey. Richard L. Ensey was the postmaster for Woodbine, Carroll County, Maryland in 1855.[5] In 1880, the Ensey family lived in the 4th Election District of Howard County, MD.  The Howard County, Maryland Directory of 1878 lists the family living in Cooksville – described as being 2 1/4 miles from Hood’s Mills and that Richard L. Ensey owned and operated a hotel.[6]

Sometime between 1882 & 1886 Will and Lydia headed out west to Iowa to make a new home.  I have wondered many time why he headed to Iowa, was it in the pursuit of land, an opportunity or family? Curious to find a reason I search the censuses’ for Lydia’s brothers low and behold, the 1885 census reveal that John D. Ensey, Lydia’s brother, was living in Guthrie County, Iowa[7].  Since I cannot find Will T. on the Iowa census of 1885 I would assume it was late 1885 or 1886 when he went West.

On May 21, 1886 Will and Lydia were blessed with the birth of their son Lee Ensey Gardiner[8].  Sadly Lydia, age 31,would die during childbirth never knowing his mother[9].

Will would return to Maryland with his infant son and after Lee’s christening  Will began the journey out west to his home in Iowa without his son.  Lydia Ensey Gardiner is buried in Menlo Cemetery in Guthrie County, Iowa. Lee was left in Maryland with his maternal grandparents until he was 21 years of age.

10 years after the death of his first wife he would marry again[10].   In 1886 Will wed Miss Mary Josephine Gamber (1877-1936) daughter of Sarah Jane Watts (1832-1913) and John Gamber (1818-1889).

Josephine Gamber Gardiner

Josephine Gamber Gardiner

In 1900 Will and Josephine lived in Pocahontas Town, Iowa[11].  William Bernard (3) and Forest Cleland (2) their children were also listed.

The Iowa Census of 1905 show the family still living in Pocahontas, Iowa with the addition of two new children – Mildred and Donald.  The 1905 census lists only name and no other information about the family.

By 1910 Will and Jo added several more children to the family – Janet (Sallie), Louis G, and Lawrence Alva Gardiner.  I was also delighted to see that Will and his first son, Lee Ensey Gardiner were reunited and living under the same roof[12].  It is also interesting to note that several other people were also living with them – Cleland Gilchrist, partner, Jane Gamber, Mother-in-law, Earl E. Ensey is listed as a hired hand, but he is actually a nephew of  Lydia’s.  I wonder if he and Lee ventured west together.  Edward Taggert, hired hand and Charles Marcy also a hired hand.

Barn

In 1915 two more children appear – Frances J. who is listed as 8 years of age (must have been in the outhouse when the 1910 census taker came) and Walter Gardiner being 2 years of age. Josephine and the all the children list their religion as Methodist.  Will T. did not disclose h is religion.  They are all residing in Grant, Pocahontas, Iowa. Walter only appears once on the census records – Family memoirs state that Walter died in a forest fire in 1918[13].  This would explain his disappearance from the 1920 census records.

Sometime between 1915 and 1920 the family relocated to North Dakota, Grant County in the Melrose Township[14]. The family still engaged in farming.  However they did not stay long and we find them living back in Iowa by 1925.

The 1925 Iowa census have me confused as to the exact location. as they appear in two different locations – one listing them as being in Dickinson, Lake, Iowa and one being in Polk. Des Moines, Iowa.

back of postcard 1911In 1930 Josephine Gardiner is living with her son William in Plymouth County, Plymouth Township in Merrill Town, Iowa.  William is the proprietor of a hotel.  His wife, Mary V. is listed as a waitress at the hotel.  They have two boarder also listed: Andrew Littman and Clara B. Gardner[15].  I am unable to find Will T. on the 1930 census.

Mary Josephine Gamber Gardiner passed away in 1936 and is buried next to Will’s first wife in the Menlo Cemetery in Guthrie County, Iowa. William Thomas Gardiner passed away two years later in 1938 and is buried in the same cemetery next to both of his wives.


[1] Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: New Market, Frederick, Maryland; Roll  M653_475; Page: 0; Image: 402. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls.

[2] Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: New Market, Frederick, Maryland; Roll  M593_587; Page: 412; Image: 211 Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003. Original data: 1870.  United States. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Administration. M593, RG29, 1,761 rolls. Minnesota. Minnesota Census Schedules for 1870. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T132, RG29, 13 rolls.

[3] Jones-Hudson, Kathi. “Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery.” USGenWeb Tombstone Project. Kathi Jones-Hudson, 25 June 2006. Web. 24 Sept. 2009. <http://usgwarchives.net>.

[4] “Howard County Marriage Licenses.” Howard County Historical Society. Web. 24 Sept. 2009. <http://www.hchsmd.org>.

[5] United States Official postal guide with the name of Postmasters. Washington, DC: J. Shillington, 1855.

[6] The Maryland Directory of 1878. Baltimore, MD: J. Frank Lewis & Co., 1878.

“Howard County, Maryland Directory 1878.” New River Notes. http://www.newrivernotes.com/md/howard1878.htm (accessed September 2009).

[7] Source Information: Ancestry.com. Iowa State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.

[8] Source Citation: Number: 481-09-3233;Issue State: Iowa;Issue Date: Before 1951. Source Information:Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

[9] Source Information:Ancestry.com. Iowa Cemetery Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Works Project Administration. Graves Registration Project. Washington, D.C.: n.p., n.d.

[10] Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Center, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T623_452; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 162. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[11] Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Center, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T623_452; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 162. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[12] Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Grant, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T624_416; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 190; Image: 826. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Or (Gardiner)original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. T624, 1,178 rolls.

[13] Gardiner, Marie Antoinette Bowlen, “My Memoir” The Gardiner’s & Relatives (August 1954)

[14] Year: 1920;Census Place: Melrose, Grant, South Dakota; Roll  T625_1719; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 158; Image: 1068.

[15] Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Plymouth, Plymouth, Iowa; Roll  672; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 25; Image: 950.0. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

Basil John Fletcher Simpson

BaSIL J. F. Simpson

Basil John Fletcher Simpson was the son of Francis Simpson and Catherine Gardiner. He was named after the first ancestor, Basil J.F. Simpson who emigrated from Edinburgh Scotland in the 1730′s.  He was born in 1830 in Unity, Montgomery County, Maryland. He and his family resided in the small village of New London, Maryland.  In 1858 he married Laura J. Nusbaum (1841-1914) and together they had 6 children – all but one reaching the age of maturity.  Basil J.F. as he was know,  was a pious and faithful servant of the Lord.  He was the superintendent and teacher of the Central United Methodist Church in New London.

Basil worked as a blacksmith, wheelwright and also a cabinet maker, building coffins during the civil war.  He passed away at a relatively early age in the comfort of his home. He is resting in peace at the Central Church Cemetery.  The following is a copy of his obituary which appered in the Frederick News on 18 FEB 1899.  It is interesting to note that all the newspapers state the year of his death and 1899, but his tombstone states he died in the year 1900. I would assume that the paper is correct as several of the family tombstones contain errors, mostly  misspellings.

 

 

 

  

THE WORK OF DEATH

Basil J. F. Simpson

Mr. Basil J. F. Simpson, whose death at New London was briefly mentionedSimpson House - New London, MD was aged 68 years, 11 months and 13 days. Death ensued from grip, the first atttack being about twelve years ago. Mr. Simpson was an honored citizen of New London for about forty years and a lifelong member of Central church, ofwhich he was a class leader for many years. His wife and four children survivehim. The children are Messrs.Ridgely, of near Frederick, Allen B., of Fort Seneca, Ohio, Mrs. John H. Albaugh, of Libertytown, and Mrs. Nelson Jones, of Montgomery county. The funeral took place last Saturday morning from, his late home, Rev.G. F. Farring officiating. Interment was made at Central chapel graveyard.

An interesting article appeared in the Frederick Examiner on 28 OCT 1858 that lends a little insight to the strong character and values that Basil possessed. It reads:

Attempted Murder

On the evening of Thursday, 7th inst., at New London, in New Market district, John H. Bevans, while laboring under an access of Mania a polu attempted to kill Mrs. P. Riggs, an aged lady, by cutting her throat.  It seems that Bevans, excited by drink to madness, had previously assailed several persons with a drawn knife, out they managed to escape to places of safety, and upon coming to the house of Mrs. Rigss, he broke open the door chased out the family, consisting of females, and catching the old lady in the street, threw her down attempted to pinion her her hands under his knee, made one cut across her throat and was in the act of repeating his murderous blow when, when he was struck in the head with a stone thrown by Mr. Basil Simpson.  He was immediately secured.  Mrs. Riggs’ wound was dressed by Dr. T.W. Simpson of Liberty; but at last accounts was in a very critical condition. Bevans we learn, has been placed in St. Joseph’s Hospital, Philadelphia.newlondon

To the right is an 1858 map of New London, MD.  You can see from the map and the Riggs, and the Bevans (Beavans) were neighbors.  Basil Simpson’s inlaws, the Nusbaum’s also live on the same street. On the 1850 census, Daniel Nusbaum, Basil’s father in-law listed his occupation as a wheelwright.  It is a natural assumption that Daniel taught Basil the same trade.

 

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