Postcards from the Past – August 22, 1962

August 22, 1962
August 22, 1962

August 22, 1962

Addressed to Miss Lilian Schley Monocacy Hall Nursing Home Frederick, MD.  Card reads : Will tell you about the sights when we get home.  Arrived at St. Thomas today.  5 days on the Ocean.  Love Mary & Wilson.

View fomr Government Hill to the Harbor, St. Thomas, V.I.

 

Postcards from the Past – August 14, 1963

August 14, 1963
August 14, 1963

August 14, 1963

This postcard is addressed to Mr. & Mrs. N.W. Schley 2427 Stuart Avenue Richmond, VA.  It reads – Here we are!  Gosh – what a beautiful place & the food is grand.  Sorry it’s only for 3 days.  We fished today but did not catch too much.  It is grand and warm and the boys are having a ball.  Bob and I are too.  Will write when I get home.  Love, Betty.

Hasting-Miramar on the boardwalk, Ocean City, MD - Back

Postcards from the Past – March 30, 1942

Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet
Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet

Where Three States and Two Rivers Meet

The postcard is addressed to Mrs. Wilson Schley from E. Clarence Shepherd, an agent for Cigar-Whelan Stores Corp. on 52 N. Market Street, Frederick, MD.  The only words on the card are “Kindly Call.”

Postcard-2-back

Postcards from the Past – October 6, 1951

Chief Justice Taney Shrine - Front
Chief Justice Taney-Back

Chief Justice Taney-Back

My latest auction acquisition, from my favorite picker,  is a series of old postcards to residents of Frederick County, Maryland. Some of the cards are from prominent families and one recipient can even be traced back to the founding fathers of Frederick, Maryland. Please note I am not related to any of the senders nor recipients. I am only posting to hope that others will enjoy as much as I do.

Chief Justice Taney Shrine - Front

Chief Justice Taney Shrine – Front

 

Tombstone Tuesday – Little Robert

Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney
Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney

Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney

Buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD –  Little Robert son of W.Y. & N.C. Page

Born September 29,1866

Died January 10, 1870

Tombstone Tuesday – Simpson Family

Simpson Marker

While walking around Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Frederick, Maryland, I ran into the graves of some distant relatives. Below is the tombstone for Paul D. Simpson and his wife Ada W. I also found several other realtive buried in the general proximity. Reviewed the family tree and it appears that Paul Dittmar Simpson (1896-1982) was the son of Ridgely D. Simpson and Annie F. Albaugh. Ridgely was the son of Basil J.F. Simpson and Laura Nusbaum. The handsome Simpson marker is what first caught my attention.

Simpson Marker

Paul & Ada Simpson

Uncle Will goes West

William T. Gardiner
Lydia Ensey Gardiner

Lydia Ensey Gardiner

William T. Gardiner

William T. Gardiner

William (Will) Thomas Gardiner (1858-1938) born in Baltimore, Maryland was the son of William H. Gardiner (1827-1902) and Ann Frances Green Gardiner (1827-1902). In 1860 Will was 2 years of age and residing with his family in the New Market District, Frederick County, MD.  His father’s profession  listed as a farmer. The value of  real estate owned is $500 and personal value is $100.   The census also reveals that his paternal Grandmother, Henrietta was also living with the family[1].

In 1870 the family lived in the New Market District of Frederick County, Maryland but the postal office is listed as Urbana, instead of Frederick.  The family was still engaged in farming.[2] His grandmother no lingered appeared on the census as she [Henrietta Simpson Gardiner] died September 30, 1866 and is buried in the Central Church Cemetery, New Market, Maryland.[3]

In June of 1880 the family is found to be residing on the Cracklin District of Montgomery County, MD.  Will is 21 years of age, and working on the family farm. In addition to his direct family members they also have residing with them Thomas Smallwood, age 13 who serves as a houseboy and Stephen Musgrove, age 15 a farm hand.

On May 2, 1882 Will married Miss Lydia E. Ensey (1854-1886)[4]. The marriage application states that Will resided in Howard County, MD working on a farm.  One would speculate that perhaps he was working on the Ensey’s farm and that is where he met Lydia..of course this is just speculation.  Lydia was born in Poplar Springs, Howard County, MD.  Daughter of Richard L. (1823-1910) and Mary Jane Ensey. Richard L. Ensey was the postmaster for Woodbine, Carroll County, Maryland in 1855.[5] In 1880, the Ensey family lived in the 4th Election District of Howard County, MD.  The Howard County, Maryland Directory of 1878 lists the family living in Cooksville – described as being 2 1/4 miles from Hood’s Mills and that Richard L. Ensey owned and operated a hotel.[6]

Sometime between 1882 & 1886 Will and Lydia headed out west to Iowa to make a new home.  I have wondered many time why he headed to Iowa, was it in the pursuit of land, an opportunity or family? Curious to find a reason I search the censuses’ for Lydia’s brothers low and behold, the 1885 census reveal that John D. Ensey, Lydia’s brother, was living in Guthrie County, Iowa[7].  Since I cannot find Will T. on the Iowa census of 1885 I would assume it was late 1885 or 1886 when he went West.

On May 21, 1886 Will and Lydia were blessed with the birth of their son Lee Ensey Gardiner[8].  Sadly Lydia, age 31,would die during childbirth never knowing his mother[9].

Will would return to Maryland with his infant son and after Lee’s christening  Will began the journey out west to his home in Iowa without his son.  Lydia Ensey Gardiner is buried in Menlo Cemetery in Guthrie County, Iowa. Lee was left in Maryland with his maternal grandparents until he was 21 years of age.

10 years after the death of his first wife he would marry again[10].   In 1886 Will wed Miss Mary Josephine Gamber (1877-1936) daughter of Sarah Jane Watts (1832-1913) and John Gamber (1818-1889).

Josephine Gamber Gardiner

Josephine Gamber Gardiner

In 1900 Will and Josephine lived in Pocahontas Town, Iowa[11].  William Bernard (3) and Forest Cleland (2) their children were also listed.

The Iowa Census of 1905 show the family still living in Pocahontas, Iowa with the addition of two new children – Mildred and Donald.  The 1905 census lists only name and no other information about the family.

By 1910 Will and Jo added several more children to the family – Janet (Sallie), Louis G, and Lawrence Alva Gardiner.  I was also delighted to see that Will and his first son, Lee Ensey Gardiner were reunited and living under the same roof[12].  It is also interesting to note that several other people were also living with them – Cleland Gilchrist, partner, Jane Gamber, Mother-in-law, Earl E. Ensey is listed as a hired hand, but he is actually a nephew of  Lydia’s.  I wonder if he and Lee ventured west together.  Edward Taggert, hired hand and Charles Marcy also a hired hand.

Barn

In 1915 two more children appear – Frances J. who is listed as 8 years of age (must have been in the outhouse when the 1910 census taker came) and Walter Gardiner being 2 years of age. Josephine and the all the children list their religion as Methodist.  Will T. did not disclose h is religion.  They are all residing in Grant, Pocahontas, Iowa. Walter only appears once on the census records – Family memoirs state that Walter died in a forest fire in 1918[13].  This would explain his disappearance from the 1920 census records.

Sometime between 1915 and 1920 the family relocated to North Dakota, Grant County in the Melrose Township[14]. The family still engaged in farming.  However they did not stay long and we find them living back in Iowa by 1925.

The 1925 Iowa census have me confused as to the exact location. as they appear in two different locations – one listing them as being in Dickinson, Lake, Iowa and one being in Polk. Des Moines, Iowa.

back of postcard 1911In 1930 Josephine Gardiner is living with her son William in Plymouth County, Plymouth Township in Merrill Town, Iowa.  William is the proprietor of a hotel.  His wife, Mary V. is listed as a waitress at the hotel.  They have two boarder also listed: Andrew Littman and Clara B. Gardner[15].  I am unable to find Will T. on the 1930 census.

Mary Josephine Gamber Gardiner passed away in 1936 and is buried next to Will’s first wife in the Menlo Cemetery in Guthrie County, Iowa. William Thomas Gardiner passed away two years later in 1938 and is buried in the same cemetery next to both of his wives.


[1] Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: New Market, Frederick, Maryland; Roll  M653_475; Page: 0; Image: 402. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls.

[2] Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: New Market, Frederick, Maryland; Roll  M593_587; Page: 412; Image: 211 Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003. Original data: 1870.  United States. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Administration. M593, RG29, 1,761 rolls. Minnesota. Minnesota Census Schedules for 1870. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T132, RG29, 13 rolls.

[3] Jones-Hudson, Kathi. “Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery.” USGenWeb Tombstone Project. Kathi Jones-Hudson, 25 June 2006. Web. 24 Sept. 2009. <http://usgwarchives.net>.

[4] “Howard County Marriage Licenses.” Howard County Historical Society. Web. 24 Sept. 2009. <http://www.hchsmd.org>.

[5] United States Official postal guide with the name of Postmasters. Washington, DC: J. Shillington, 1855.

[6] The Maryland Directory of 1878. Baltimore, MD: J. Frank Lewis & Co., 1878.

“Howard County, Maryland Directory 1878.” New River Notes. http://www.newrivernotes.com/md/howard1878.htm (accessed September 2009).

[7] Source Information: Ancestry.com. Iowa State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.

[8] Source Citation: Number: 481-09-3233;Issue State: Iowa;Issue Date: Before 1951. Source Information:Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

[9] Source Information:Ancestry.com. Iowa Cemetery Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Works Project Administration. Graves Registration Project. Washington, D.C.: n.p., n.d.

[10] Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Center, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T623_452; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 162. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[11] Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Center, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T623_452; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 162. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[12] Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Grant, Pocahontas, Iowa; Roll  T624_416; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 190; Image: 826. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Or (Gardiner)original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. T624, 1,178 rolls.

[13] Gardiner, Marie Antoinette Bowlen, “My Memoir” The Gardiner’s & Relatives (August 1954)

[14] Year: 1920;Census Place: Melrose, Grant, South Dakota; Roll  T625_1719; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 158; Image: 1068.

[15] Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Plymouth, Plymouth, Iowa; Roll  672; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 25; Image: 950.0. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

General James C. Clarke

Clarke Monument at Mt. Olivet

James C. Clarke was a distinguished man and Frederick, Maryland resident. He was one of the most notable railroad men in History.  He was brought into the world by Dr. Gustavus Warfield on March 3, 1824 in Unity, Montgomery County, MD.  Son of Elizabeth (Betsy) Simpson and William Clarke. The Simpsons’ originally came from the South England and his father from Newtownards, County Down, Ireland.  Betsy and William were entered into the estate of matrimony by the Reverend Doctor Jennings on May 4, 1823. William was employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad when it was extending its line into Frederick County.

Betsy Simpson Clarke was very spoiled and high spirited.  They were aristocratic,descending from Worthington’s and Ridgely’s, and quite wealthy owning many slaves.  Mr. William Clarke was very amiable and endeavored to please her but she would frequently fly into a rage and seeking revenge would set free some of the slaves.  Finally Mr. William Clarke would leave her and the family never to return.

Betsy in time became poor and at 12 years of age James C. Clarke stopped his schooling at Point of Rocks, MD to seek employment. He called on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal but was refused work due to his young age.  James pressed on telling them he had a mother to support.  They admired his courage and started him as a water boy.  By age 16 he was a  mule driver of a canal boat and held the position for four years eventually rising to the owner of a boat, which was sunk in a collision.

In 1844,  when he was 20 years of age, he applied for a job on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and was accepted.  His hard work and industrious application soon brought their reward.  For 10 years he labored for the B & O starting in the machine and repair shops advancing to a locomotive fireman and next an engineer.  He was an ambitious young man on the move.  He soon mastered the conductors job, station agent and then  train master. During his term of service he ran the old engine “Arabian.”

December 21, 1852 he married Susan Schaffer (1832-1892), daughter of Peter Schaffer and Elizabeth Brunner.  The Brunner family it should be noted was one of the first families of Frederick. Her great-grandfather, Jacob Bruner, founded a tract of land called “Shiverstadt” now known as Schifferstadt and the home still remains to this day. James and Susan had 5 children.

General James C. ClarkeIn 1854 James C. Clarke was made superintendent of the Central Ohio Railroad where he was when the famous Col. John H. Drone, master of transportation on the B & O ,was selected as General Superintendent of the Illinois Central Railroad.  The only man that he asked to bring with him for the job was James C. Clarke.  James was appointed Assistant Superintendent under Col. Drone.

Col. Drone died in an accident at Hyde Park in 1856 and James Clarke succeeded him as General Superintendent.  While in charge he had the task of safely transporting President Abraham Lincoln from Harrisburg, PA to Washington, DC. A few years before Abraham Lincoln had been an attorney for the Illinois Central Railway.

The Clarke family was eager to return to Maryland to engage in farming, milling and merchandising in Frederick County, MD.  He was regularly visited by Federal and Confederate Armies. He once owned the farm that was owned by Governor Frank Thomas.

From 1862-1870 he took charge of the Ashland Iron works in Baltimore County, Maryland at a large salary in the manufacturing of iron.  His success was unparalleled, he soon became an owner of interest in this establishment.

In 1866 after three years residency in Baltimore County, J.C. Clarke was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates.  In 1867 he was elected to the State Senate in Annapolis where he served for two terms at that point he was offered the presidency of the Western Railroad for a handsome salary, but turned it down for his first love the canal.

in 1870 Governor Bowie met with the Board of Public Works in Annapolis and nominated J. C. Clarke as President of the C & O Canal at $10,000.00 dollars per annum.  The highest salary ever paid.

In 1872 General Clarke was made President and General Manager of the Erie Railroad where he remained until 1874.  He was then made an offer to be the General Superintendent of the Illinois Central Railroad, rising to President of the railroad in 1883.  During his 4 year presidency the railroad shared in the general prosperity incidental to the western boom in immigration.Frederick, Md. City Hall

In 1888 Clarke went with the Mobile and Ohio Railroad for a year and a half as its V.P. and General Manager.  He salvaged a flailing railroad and was able to put back the road on a paying basis and when he retired in 1898 left the railroad in a most prosperous condition. Clarke is described as a rough and ready railroader, tall and strong with a can-do attitude. He was a master story teller was loved by all.

James C. Clarke passed away December 9, 1902 of Bright’s Disease.   He is honored in death by a family monument in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.  Buried beside him are his wife, children and family friend Caroline V. Haller.

Clarke Place, a charming street in Frederick County, Maryland was named for James C. Clarke. The beautiful fountain in front of the old court house (now City Hall) was donated to the City of Frederick in 1862 by the General.  General Clarke had a love affair with the city for which he and his family had resided and he always remained a benefactor.

Clarke Monument at Mt. Olivet

Photograph of City Hall & Clarke Monument Courtesy of Bob Carney, all rights reserved.