Tombstone Tuesday – “I’m ready now”

Miller Clarke

 

While combing through the Frederick County Historical Society’s collection I stumbled across an entry in the Margaret Myers Collection.  ”Married Horace W. Clarke & Katie Miller – October 1st 1881 – Milan, Tennessee.  There aren’t that many Horace Clarke’s in the area so I knew it was my family line.

But what I didn’t know was that he had been married to a Miss Kate Miller.  Horace Clarke was a famous railroader who descended from one of the most illustrious railroad men of all time his father – James C. Clarke.

Horace’s railroad career would relocate him from Frederick to the Tennessee area.  He married Kate Miller, daughter of Hezekiah and Julia Miller.  Her father, also know as H.P. Miller, was proprietor of the Southern Pacific Hotel.

I was so excited to see he had produced an offspring as this was the end of the Clarke line.  But my excitement was short lived when I found the obituary for his one and only son.  Horace Miller Clarke (1883-1887).

Little “Miller Clarke”, died at the age of five at the home of his grandfather.

The exquisitely carved stone denotes a cherubic boy with a writing instrument in his hand tracing over the words, “I’m Ready Now.’

I can only imagine the pain of losing a child at such an early age.  The love for the child is evident by the stunning stone they erected in memoriam of this sweet little angel.  Little Miller Clarke, as he is identified, lies in eternal peace beside his maternal grandparents, H.P. and Julia Miller.  I do not know what become of his mother, Kate Miller Clarke.

His father Horace would go on to marry again in  1903 to Miss Virginia Alice Shriner from Frederick, Md.  Horace passed away in 1912 and interred in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD ,in the prestigious family plot adorned by a large obelisk monument.

May you rest in peace and now that you are not forgotten..

Special thanks and credit for all of the photo’s is kindly extended to Toni Kee.  Toni is a contributor and volunteer for www.findagrave.com who took the photo’s and sent them to me.  It is with permission from Toni that I share the enclosed photographs.  Click the link to see the listing on findagrave.com.

 

Tombstone Cold Case – Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.
Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.

On my walks thru the Central Church Cemetery in New Market, MD. I noticed a plain, small and very old stone that caught my attention. It seemed so diminutive and simple that I wanted to find out a bit about the person buried beneath the stone.  As you can decipher from the photograph the information on the stone is limited –   Basil Dorsey, Jr. (1768-1823).  Nothing else is inscribed other than the name and date.  I decided to add this to my list of Cold Case Tombstones stories. This is a hobby of mine; just choosing a random tombstone and researching.

Basil Dorsey, Jr. was the son of Basil Dorsey (1720-1799) and Harriet Harris (1775-1829).  Jr. was born on Valentine’s Day in Anne Arundel County. In reading local history books it is written that his father, Judge Basil Dorsey,  was appointed the Justice for Frederick County, MD in 1777.

Basil Jr. and Harriet had two daughters Maria (1793-1812)  and Cordelia (1798-married Vachel Randall. and Cordelia.  Cordelia first married William Downey, and secondly Rev. Nicholas Dorsey of Elkridge, a Methodist preacher.

The article,  McKinsey Folger, “New Market’s Name believed Derived from Nearby Plains”  Frederick News Post 24-Sept-1941: pg 10. shares additional information about Cordelia Dorsey Downing. Pat Bishop’s article titled, “Central UM Church plans Hymn Sing Sunday” Frederick News Post 6-Nov-1971: pg 4-B4. Explains that Cordelia Downey donated the land for the church that sits across from her grave.  Isn’t it ironic that father of the person who donated the land has such a diminutive grave. 

Newmarktnewspaper

Genealogist or Ghostbuster?

It was the day after All Hallows Eve -  the neighborhoods streets still lined with jack-o-lanterns and my paranormal senses still on overload from a ghost tour I had taken the night previous.  I ventured out to the Central Church Cemetery in the countryside of Maryland surrounded by gorgeous autumnal views of the mountains, a spectacular array of colored foliage and the smell of outdoor fires.
I am a frequent visitor to the cemetery that holds the remains of my ancestors. Wrapped in my warm jacket I methodically made my way up and down the rows, taking note of the names on faded stones and lamenting the fact that so many stones have recently fallen over. Today was a little different from my previous trips.  I had the strangest sensation of being watched.

I turned to look at the small and empty white chapel that sits outside the cemetery gates. I thought I saw movement in the window – despite an empty parking lot and locked door.  I snapped two photo’s of the chapel with my blackberry camera phone.  Stared a while at the window – seeing nothing out of the ordinary I decided to call it a day and head home.

After dinner, I started uploading tombstone photo’s when I ran across the photo of the chapel… I got the goosebumps.  The two photo’s of the chapel seem to have a shadowy figure looking out the window.  Is this my imagination gone wild or do you see it too?

Central Church Cemetery

Central Church Cemetery

Inez Vistula Bowlen Gardiner

Inez

 

I love when I stumble upon an obituary for a family member that is well written and informative.  The following obituary is for my Great-Grandmother Inez Bowlen Gardiner.  As the obit states she was riding in the car with my grandparents while taken ill and rushed to the hospital. What it neglects to mention is that she was holding my father, Bernard L. Gardiner in her arms.

Frederick New Post,  December 20, 1932.

Tombstone Tuesday – Little Robert

Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney
Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney

Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney

Buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD –  Little Robert son of W.Y. & N.C. Page

Born September 29,1866

Died January 10, 1870

Tombstone Tuesday – Caroline & C.W. Sinn

Sinn
Sinn

Photograph Courtesy of Bob Carney

Caroline & C.W. Sinn

I love this time of year, the gorgeous autumnal colors, cool crisp temperatures and of course Halloween.  My friend Bob Carney is a local photographer with a lot of talent.  A while back he and his photography cohorts did a photo walk at Mt. Olivet.  I love this picture for a couple of reasons – Firstly the surname on the tombstone is “SINN”, and secondly the “ghostly” apparition between the stone. Look between the two tombstones – do you see anything?  Funny how much the image resembles my friend Bob.

Sinn

Tombstone Tuesday – Simpson Family

Simpson Marker

While walking around Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Frederick, Maryland, I ran into the graves of some distant relatives. Below is the tombstone for Paul D. Simpson and his wife Ada W. I also found several other realtive buried in the general proximity. Reviewed the family tree and it appears that Paul Dittmar Simpson (1896-1982) was the son of Ridgely D. Simpson and Annie F. Albaugh. Ridgely was the son of Basil J.F. Simpson and Laura Nusbaum. The handsome Simpson marker is what first caught my attention.

Simpson Marker

Paul & Ada Simpson

Wordless Wednesday – Gotta Love the Hat!

Henrietta (Hettie) Gardiner
Henrietta Gardiner

Henrietta Gardiner

Henrietta Gardiner 

(1863-1945)

Gotta Love the Hat!

 

Tombstone Tuesday – William Ezra Linwood Candler Bowlen

William Ezra Linwood Candler Bowlen

William Ezra “Linwood” Candler Bowlen  (1859-1865)

Little Linwood was the son of Felicia Edmonia Candler and Dr. George W. Bowlen.  Dr. Bowlen was a prominent civil war doctor that practiced in Barnesville, MD.  Linwood is buried in a remote cemetery in Barnesville located on Barnesville Road.  It was once owned and maintained by The Barnesville Methodist Church. From the looks of the site it appears that no one is maintaining the site.

At the time of his death, the family were Methodist.  His death propelled Dr. Bowlen to study religion and made the decision to switch religions to Catholicism.  This would explain why he is not buried with the remainder of the family at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Barnesville. 

Rest in peace little one. 

General James C. Clarke

Clarke Monument at Mt. Olivet

James C. Clarke was a distinguished man and Frederick, Maryland resident. He was one of the most notable railroad men in History.  He was brought into the world by Dr. Gustavus Warfield on March 3, 1824 in Unity, Montgomery County, MD.  Son of Elizabeth (Betsy) Simpson and William Clarke. The Simpsons’ originally came from the South England and his father from Newtownards, County Down, Ireland.  Betsy and William were entered into the estate of matrimony by the Reverend Doctor Jennings on May 4, 1823. William was employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad when it was extending its line into Frederick County.

Betsy Simpson Clarke was very spoiled and high spirited.  They were aristocratic,descending from Worthington’s and Ridgely’s, and quite wealthy owning many slaves.  Mr. William Clarke was very amiable and endeavored to please her but she would frequently fly into a rage and seeking revenge would set free some of the slaves.  Finally Mr. William Clarke would leave her and the family never to return.

Betsy in time became poor and at 12 years of age James C. Clarke stopped his schooling at Point of Rocks, MD to seek employment. He called on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal but was refused work due to his young age.  James pressed on telling them he had a mother to support.  They admired his courage and started him as a water boy.  By age 16 he was a  mule driver of a canal boat and held the position for four years eventually rising to the owner of a boat, which was sunk in a collision.

In 1844,  when he was 20 years of age, he applied for a job on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and was accepted.  His hard work and industrious application soon brought their reward.  For 10 years he labored for the B & O starting in the machine and repair shops advancing to a locomotive fireman and next an engineer.  He was an ambitious young man on the move.  He soon mastered the conductors job, station agent and then  train master. During his term of service he ran the old engine “Arabian.”

December 21, 1852 he married Susan Schaffer (1832-1892), daughter of Peter Schaffer and Elizabeth Brunner.  The Brunner family it should be noted was one of the first families of Frederick. Her great-grandfather, Jacob Bruner, founded a tract of land called “Shiverstadt” now known as Schifferstadt and the home still remains to this day. James and Susan had 5 children.

General James C. ClarkeIn 1854 James C. Clarke was made superintendent of the Central Ohio Railroad where he was when the famous Col. John H. Drone, master of transportation on the B & O ,was selected as General Superintendent of the Illinois Central Railroad.  The only man that he asked to bring with him for the job was James C. Clarke.  James was appointed Assistant Superintendent under Col. Drone.

Col. Drone died in an accident at Hyde Park in 1856 and James Clarke succeeded him as General Superintendent.  While in charge he had the task of safely transporting President Abraham Lincoln from Harrisburg, PA to Washington, DC. A few years before Abraham Lincoln had been an attorney for the Illinois Central Railway.

The Clarke family was eager to return to Maryland to engage in farming, milling and merchandising in Frederick County, MD.  He was regularly visited by Federal and Confederate Armies. He once owned the farm that was owned by Governor Frank Thomas.

From 1862-1870 he took charge of the Ashland Iron works in Baltimore County, Maryland at a large salary in the manufacturing of iron.  His success was unparalleled, he soon became an owner of interest in this establishment.

In 1866 after three years residency in Baltimore County, J.C. Clarke was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates.  In 1867 he was elected to the State Senate in Annapolis where he served for two terms at that point he was offered the presidency of the Western Railroad for a handsome salary, but turned it down for his first love the canal.

in 1870 Governor Bowie met with the Board of Public Works in Annapolis and nominated J. C. Clarke as President of the C & O Canal at $10,000.00 dollars per annum.  The highest salary ever paid.

In 1872 General Clarke was made President and General Manager of the Erie Railroad where he remained until 1874.  He was then made an offer to be the General Superintendent of the Illinois Central Railroad, rising to President of the railroad in 1883.  During his 4 year presidency the railroad shared in the general prosperity incidental to the western boom in immigration.Frederick, Md. City Hall

In 1888 Clarke went with the Mobile and Ohio Railroad for a year and a half as its V.P. and General Manager.  He salvaged a flailing railroad and was able to put back the road on a paying basis and when he retired in 1898 left the railroad in a most prosperous condition. Clarke is described as a rough and ready railroader, tall and strong with a can-do attitude. He was a master story teller was loved by all.

James C. Clarke passed away December 9, 1902 of Bright’s Disease.   He is honored in death by a family monument in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.  Buried beside him are his wife, children and family friend Caroline V. Haller.

Clarke Place, a charming street in Frederick County, Maryland was named for James C. Clarke. The beautiful fountain in front of the old court house (now City Hall) was donated to the City of Frederick in 1862 by the General.  General Clarke had a love affair with the city for which he and his family had resided and he always remained a benefactor.

Clarke Monument at Mt. Olivet

Photograph of City Hall & Clarke Monument Courtesy of Bob Carney, all rights reserved.