Wordless Wednesday

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I recently found this photo in an antique store.  The names listed on the majorettes (L to R) are Betty Dawson, Lucille Hoffman, Becky Sixus (sp?) and Joann Boyer.  If they are your family members and you would like the photo please let me know.

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Samuel Estill & Rosa Mills – UPDATE – 1/15/13

I am delighted to report that the marriage certificate detailed in a previous post has found a home!  We successfully tracked down a descendent who was thrilled to has to received the original marriage certificates complete with photo’s.

The family also shared a genealogical rundown as well.  If you are related to Samuel or Rosa and looking for more information please contact me and I will reach out to the descendents.

 

Madness Monday – Looking for descedants of Samuel Estill & Rosa Mills

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I am looking to a pay it forward and do a good deed! Through my auction scout,  I recently came into the possession of an original marriage certificate for Samuel Estill (1824-1890) &  Rosa Mills (1852-1907). They were married in Menard County, Illinois in the year 1872. I have contacted several Ancestry trees owners with the subjects –  and to date no response. I would love to place this treasured heirloom in the hands of a descendant. Please share this post so we can return to the rightful owner.  I am not looking to sell this – only return for FREE.

Monocacy Battlefield – There’s an App for That!

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The Monocacy National Battlefield  is a local treasure for students, historians and civil war buffs.  The battlefield is located in Frederick, Md and where  “The Battle that saved Washington” took place on July9, 1864.  Managed by the National Park Service it  is a fee-free park , open seven days a week from 8:30am – 5:00pm.  During summer months the park rangers and volunteers offer walking tours and special programs.  The visitor center is a state of the art facility and offers an eight – minute fiberoptic map presentation,  several interactive exihibits and numerous artifacts currently on display. 

I recently had the pleasure of meeting a ranger from the park who shared that there is an iPhone/iPad app for the battlefield.  The Monocacy National Battlfied app is loaded with facts and interesting features ranging  from the civilians who lived there to the soldiers who faught there.  For a list of all the features check out their website.  Kudo’s on a job well done and for making history fun.

 

 

Montgomery County Courthouse 1835

The courthouse where your  ancestors lived can unlock a variety of clues.  I have transcribed the notes below. I wish I knew the final outcome.

“The joint and severally answers of William Gardiner and Henrietta his wife to the bill of Ann William complainant.  These defendants answering for himself and herself and not one for the other answering say that Francis Simpson executed the deed of trust, mentioned in the complaintants bill to William Clarke for the purposes therein mentioned and they admit that the defendant William Gardiner purchased the land conveyed by a deed of trust, to Clarke and gave him single bills for the same as in the said bill is alleged and defendants admit that the said Clarke executed to this defendant Williams a bond of conveyance for the said land conditioned as in the said bill.

Your defendant admits that the complainant has become entitled to one of the single bills aforesaid and obtained judgement therein against the defendant Williams That another of said single bills was assigned by Williams blank to a certain Henry Jamison and that said Jamison obtained judgement thereon, and levied a fieri facias on a part of the lands aforesaid, then in posession of these defendants or instructed to do so and that the said Hobbs and Price have obtained posession  of a part of said lands for a sum much below their real value and Williams appointed to do the same because he was not able to help himself. These defendants further admit that the said William Gardiner did apply the bond of conveyance aforesaid to the said Gustavas Warfield without any valuable consideration or a merely nominal one and that the said Gustavas Warfield well knew the purchase money for the said land was not paid.  These defendants admit that said William has become insolvent and that William Price in said bill mentioned has been appointeed his Trustee and that William Clarke has not take the proper steps to execute the trust  esposed in him and theses defendants have nothing to oppose to the prayer of the complainants bill, but desire that the lands purchase by this defendant William may be sold. The several conditions of said Simpson satisfied out of the balance one from the _____Williams of said land and the surplus paid to the custody of this defendant William and if any remaining, that it be paid over to this case of the defendants Wife and child and these defendants admit that claim of the said plaintiff is due within a small amount but they are entitled to credit on the note remaining in Francis Simpson’s lands  an allowance for mistakes in calculating  the purchase money and other allowances which these defendants pray may be ascertained by the the ___and they as in duty ___will ever pray.

State of Maryland

Montgomery County, Maryland

On this the 7th day of November Anno Domini 1835.  Personally appeared before the subscriber a Justiceof the Peace in and for said county.  William Gardiner and Henrietta his wife and made oath on the Holy Evangely of Almighty by God, that the matter and things in the above answers stated are true as stated to the best of their knowledge and beliefs.”

The port where my great grandfather set sail for America

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The year was 1880 and my great grandfather, Terrence Daniel O’ Sullivan, was leaving the village of Loughfouder, County Kerry Ireland to set sail for America. Family lore tells that all of the O’ Sullivan children departed for the new land from Cobh.  Cobh, translates  into “cove”; and is pronounced the same way. When my great grandfather set sail it was known as Cobh but had several different names over the years, first being known as Cove in 1750. In 1849 it was changed to Queensland the name remained until it was changed back to Cobh in 1922.

On our recent trip to Ireland it was my intention to retrace his footsteps as best possible. We started with a lovely family reunion and then visited the homestead where he was born in 1865.  We then decided to travel to Cobh to see the port from which he emigrated to North America.

Cobh is situated on Great Island, one of three large islands in the Cork Harbor in County Cork, Ireland.  Over 6 million people emigrated from Ireland during the years of 1848-1950. 2.5 million sailed from Cobh making it the single most important port of emigration. Sadly Cobh is also famous for being the last port of call for the RMS Titanic on her tragic voyage. 123 passengers boarded the RMS Titanic on April 11, 1912.

Upon arriving the first thing that drew our attention was the view of the harbor.  Cobh is hilly and descends towards the water. The clean and narrow streets are lined with  brightly colored homes, stores and pubs that face southward towards the waterfront.  The people are exceptionally friendly.  My daughter and I walked up and down the streets and visited the lovely Kennedy Park.  The park was filled with people of all ages and a spectacular display of flowers.

Colleen & Puppy

We ran into a woman with an adorable puppy, just a mutt; but adorable just the same.  She immediately and without hesitation offered her sweet puppy to my daughter to hold.  She happily obliged.

Kennedy Park

The neo-Gothic cathedral of St. Colman is simply stunning.  It is a Roman Catholic cathedral and sits high on a hill overlooking the harbor as if it is protecting the town and the harbor.  The Cathedral is in everyday use for worship and prayer. It took 47 years to complete the building.

A trip to Cobh would not be complete without a visit to the museum to experience “The Queenstown Story”; which walks you through your ancestors emigration from the Great Potato Famine to the 1950′s.  They also chronicle the tragedies of RMS Titanic and Lusitania with several interactive displays.

We thoroughly enjoyed our trip to Cobh.  I could not help but think of Great Grandfather Sullivan and wonder what emotions were running through his head on the day of his journey.  Was he sad, excited…both?  One will never really know I guess.  I spent a lot of time gazing out into the harbor and envisiong him sailing on the ship headed to America.  The picture of the harbor is one that I cherish for it is from this port and this harbor that my line of the O’ Sullivan’s began the journey of a lifetime.

Cork Harbour

Tombstone Cold Case – Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.
Basil Dorsey, Jr.

Basil Dorsey, Jr.

On my walks thru the Central Church Cemetery in New Market, MD. I noticed a plain, small and very old stone that caught my attention. It seemed so diminutive and simple that I wanted to find out a bit about the person buried beneath the stone.  As you can decipher from the photograph the information on the stone is limited –   Basil Dorsey, Jr. (1768-1823).  Nothing else is inscribed other than the name and date.  I decided to add this to my list of Cold Case Tombstones stories. This is a hobby of mine; just choosing a random tombstone and researching.

Basil Dorsey, Jr. was the son of Basil Dorsey (1720-1799) and Harriet Harris (1775-1829).  Jr. was born on Valentine’s Day in Anne Arundel County. In reading local history books it is written that his father, Judge Basil Dorsey,  was appointed the Justice for Frederick County, MD in 1777.

Basil Jr. and Harriet had two daughters Maria (1793-1812)  and Cordelia (1798-married Vachel Randall. and Cordelia.  Cordelia first married William Downey, and secondly Rev. Nicholas Dorsey of Elkridge, a Methodist preacher.

The article,  McKinsey Folger, “New Market’s Name believed Derived from Nearby Plains”  Frederick News Post 24-Sept-1941: pg 10. shares additional information about Cordelia Dorsey Downing. Pat Bishop’s article titled, “Central UM Church plans Hymn Sing Sunday” Frederick News Post 6-Nov-1971: pg 4-B4. Explains that Cordelia Downey donated the land for the church that sits across from her grave.  Isn’t it ironic that father of the person who donated the land has such a diminutive grave. 

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Long Flight of Runaway Horse

Washington Post January 1, 1905

Ring of Kerry

My great grandfather, Terrence D. Sullivan, was born in 1865 in Loughfouder,Knocknagoshel County Kerry, Ireland. 100 years later I came along. As I prepare for my pilgrimage to the O’ Sullivan reunion and homestead I cannot help but stop and reflect upon the man I know so much, but yet so little about. Terrence Daniel Sullivan, son of James & Mary Connor O’ Sullivan was born in the year 1865. When he was 15 years of age he came to America.

While in America he worked as a harness maker in Washington, DC. It has been passed down thru family lore that he used the famous Irish stitch on the saddles he made.

In 1888, he married Josephine Bridget Fealy.  They would go on to have 9 children total with only three surviving to adulthood; one being my grandmother – Cecilia Sullivan.

I can’t keep my mind from wandering of the genealogical treasures that await in Loughfouder.  Will there be any evidence that my great grandfather once roamed the hills. Perhaps initials carved in the stone wall surrounding the homestead.  Perhaps a note he sent home neatly tucked in the family bible.

I depart in just a few days and  I will share with you my journey back to County Kerry, Ireland for the O’ Sullivan Family reunion.  I can’t help but feel the smiling eye’s of Terrence and Cecilia beaming down upon me.

Inez Vistula Bowlen Gardiner

Inez

 

I love when I stumble upon an obituary for a family member that is well written and informative.  The following obituary is for my Great-Grandmother Inez Bowlen Gardiner.  As the obit states she was riding in the car with my grandparents while taken ill and rushed to the hospital. What it neglects to mention is that she was holding my father, Bernard L. Gardiner in her arms.

Frederick New Post,  December 20, 1932.