Wordless Wednesday – Henry Bernard Gardiner

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My Great Grandfather.  It has been told that his hair turned white overnight after his young son was killed on railroad tracks.

 

Tombstone Tuesday – “I’m ready now”

Miller Clarke

 

While combing through the Frederick County Historical Society’s collection I stumbled across an entry in the Margaret Myers Collection.  ”Married Horace W. Clarke & Katie Miller – October 1st 1881 – Milan, Tennessee.  There aren’t that many Horace Clarke’s in the area so I knew it was my family line.

But what I didn’t know was that he had been married to a Miss Kate Miller.  Horace Clarke was a famous railroader who descended from one of the most illustrious railroad men of all time his father – James C. Clarke.

Horace’s railroad career would relocate him from Frederick to the Tennessee area.  He married Kate Miller, daughter of Hezekiah and Julia Miller.  Her father, also know as H.P. Miller, was proprietor of the Southern Pacific Hotel.

I was so excited to see he had produced an offspring as this was the end of the Clarke line.  But my excitement was short lived when I found the obituary for his one and only son.  Horace Miller Clarke (1883-1887).

Little “Miller Clarke”, died at the age of five at the home of his grandfather.

The exquisitely carved stone denotes a cherubic boy with a writing instrument in his hand tracing over the words, “I’m Ready Now.’

I can only imagine the pain of losing a child at such an early age.  The love for the child is evident by the stunning stone they erected in memoriam of this sweet little angel.  Little Miller Clarke, as he is identified, lies in eternal peace beside his maternal grandparents, H.P. and Julia Miller.  I do not know what become of his mother, Kate Miller Clarke.

His father Horace would go on to marry again in  1903 to Miss Virginia Alice Shriner from Frederick, Md.  Horace passed away in 1912 and interred in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD ,in the prestigious family plot adorned by a large obelisk monument.

May you rest in peace and now that you are not forgotten..

Special thanks and credit for all of the photo’s is kindly extended to Toni Kee.  Toni is a contributor and volunteer for www.findagrave.com who took the photo’s and sent them to me.  It is with permission from Toni that I share the enclosed photographs.  Click the link to see the listing on findagrave.com.

 

Monocacy Battlefield – There’s an App for That!

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The Monocacy National Battlefield  is a local treasure for students, historians and civil war buffs.  The battlefield is located in Frederick, Md and where  “The Battle that saved Washington” took place on July9, 1864.  Managed by the National Park Service it  is a fee-free park , open seven days a week from 8:30am – 5:00pm.  During summer months the park rangers and volunteers offer walking tours and special programs.  The visitor center is a state of the art facility and offers an eight – minute fiberoptic map presentation,  several interactive exihibits and numerous artifacts currently on display. 

I recently had the pleasure of meeting a ranger from the park who shared that there is an iPhone/iPad app for the battlefield.  The Monocacy National Battlfied app is loaded with facts and interesting features ranging  from the civilians who lived there to the soldiers who faught there.  For a list of all the features check out their website.  Kudo’s on a job well done and for making history fun.

 

 

Fearless Females – Amanda Malvina Fitzalan Delzell

 

March 3 — Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you  were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

Amanda Malvina Fitzalan Delzell

Reading glasses resting on an open book

Looking at this interesting name the goal was to discover additional genealogical information on the Delzell family.

Amanda Malvina Fitzhallen Delzell was born 16 May 1852, daughter of Sarah Ann Robinson Worthington Clarke and Robert Delzell.

In researching the name I found that is was not a family naming pattern nor a clue to ancestors.

 It turns out that Amanda Milvena Fitzallen was a heroine in The Children of the Abbey - an eighteenth  century novel by the Irish romantic novelist Regina Maria Roche.  The book remained a best seller until the end of the nineteeth century. It was filled with adventure and misfortunes and is set in Wales, Ireland, Scotland and England.  Jane Austen mentioned the work in her novel, Emma. I interpret the mention as a positive recommendation of the novel.

While it does not provide surname clues it does tell me that her mother was well-read, modern and perhaps a hopeless romantic.

 

 

 

 

 

Fearless Females-What’s in a name?

Sarah Ann Robinson Worthington Clarke

March 3 — Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

Sarah Ann Robinson Worthington Clarke Delzell Carder. 

How is that for a name?  It would never fit on our standardized forms of today.

The long name has genealogical significance and offers a clue to ancestors.  A name to preserve and pass down through the generations. The name is so important that they named their first daughter the EXACT same name. Sadly the first Sarah died as an infant in 1826.

Sarah Ann Robinson Worthington Clarke was born June 22, 1830 in Frederick County, Maryland. The child of Elizabeth Simpson & William Clarke. Her father William, was born in Newtownards, County Down, Ireland on March 25, 1799.  Elizabeth Simpson descends from some of the first and finest families in Maryland.

In dissecting I turned first to the Irish naming pattern from her father’s native land. The pattern states that the first daughter is named after the mother’s mother.

So we have a match!

Sarah-maternal grandmothers name (SARAH WORTHINGTON)

Ann – maternal great grandmother was (ANN RIDGELY)

Robinson -(?) A clue that needs researching! I can’t find anywhere in the maternal line so I am assuming it is from the paternal line.

Worthington – Grandmother’s last name – (SARAH WORTHINGTON)

Delzell – She married Robert Delzell in Frederick County, MD 15 Feb 1848.

Carder – She married John F. Carder 18 Oct 1855

A long name indeed and a very interesting naming pattern filled with genealogical significance.

 

Life is a box of chocolates

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On Valentine’s Day I read a tweet from my youngest daugther that was so deep rooted in pure, raw emotion it moved my soul and touched my heart. I have found Twitter to be a place to express feelings -feelings otherwise we might not bother to share. In 140 characters or less she expressed a heart felt sentiment, “Never knew how much a box of chocolates and a hug could mean to someone until it’s gone, rest in peace Pop I love you.” Sometimes it is the smallest gestures, a modest gift, that create our most treasured memories. For you see each Valentine’s Day my father would deliver a small red box filled with a few chocolates and a lifetime of love. Yes Valentine’s Day will never be the same without you and that box of chocolates. We love you Pop (Bernie Gardiner) and you will forever be in our hearts. For your girls – life is a box of chocolates.